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Past and Present of Livingston County
Volume 2. Biographies

by Major A. J. Roof. 1913

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ELI J. MARSH.

Pages 298-300

Eli J. Marsh, living retired in Chillicothe, has many claims the high respect and regard in which he is uniformly held, for he is an honored veteran of the Civil war and during his active life was closely identified with legal and business interests of the community. He was born near Sacket Harbor, New York, on August 2, 1833, and is a son of James and Sarah (Membry) Marsh, natives of Devonshire, England, who came to America at an early date and settled on a farm in New York. The father followed general agricultural pursuits during all his life. The mother was a daughter of Captain Amos Membry, prominent in the British navy. To their union were born ten children: Eli J., of this review; Luther, who resides in Charles City, Iowa; Sophia, who married J. S. Faudrey, of Adams Center, New York; Walter, who resides in Homer, Calhoun county, Michigan; George, who is a farmer near Charles City, Iowa; and Frederick, a colonel in the United States army, now residing in San Francisco. The other children born to Mr. and Mrs. Marsh died in infancy.

Eli J. Marsh acquired a public-school education and after completing it taught in Jefferson county, New York, for three years. At the end of that time he entered law school in Albany, New York, and was graduated in 1858, after which he studied under Judie Ira Harris, then United States senator. He located for the practice of his profession in Adams, New York, and built up an extensive and representative patronage, conducting his patronage capably until the outbreak of the Civil war, when he went to the front as first lieutenant with a company of New York volunteer infantry. He afterward earned advancement and was mustered out as lieutenant colonel. In 1866 he came to Chillicothe and practiced in a private capacity until the spring of 1869, when he was appointed judge of the court of common pleas, serving with great energy, ability and impartiality and making a record in office over which no shadow or suspicion of evil ever fell. In 1869 Mr. Marsh purchased the Chillicothe Tribune, which he conducted for twenty years. He made this one of the leading journals in this part of the state, for in its columns he advocated always the most progressive and worthy principles and supported warmly and intelligently all projects for the general good. As a director of public thought and opinion he was invaluable to the community, as his great influence was never given to a dishonorable cause and never unworthily used, He sold the paper on the 1st of January, 1890, and since that time has been living retired,

In the spring of 1859 Mr. Marsh was united in marriage to Miss Mary Skinner, a daughter of Judge Calvin Skinner, of Adams, New York. They became the parents of a daughter, Maria, born in May, 1860, who has passed away. Mr. Marsh has always taken an active interest in local affairs and has served in various important capacities, including those of city attorney and postmaster, which latter position he held for fourteen years. Since 1860 he has been affiliated with the Masonic order. In religious belief he is a Unitarian. There are few citizens in Livingston county more widely and favorably known than Mr. Marsh, whose enterprise and spirit of initiative carried him forward into important professional and business relations and whose stalwart character has made his prominence a force for good.

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